5th Annual Taking Root Luncheon

On behalf of the board and staff of the Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation, I’d like to thank all the sponsors, supporters, attendees, host committee members, our keynote speaker Peter Hatch, and especially our incredible co-chairs Vallette and Russell Windham for the success of this year’s Taking Root luncheon. Thanks to you all we met our…

Amoreuxia wrightii – Wright’s Yellowshow

Plant of the month: Wright’s Yellowshow (Amoreuxia wrightii)  During my first year at Peckerwood, a strange plant suddenly appeared in a raised bed near John’s house. The intriguing foliage was unfamiliar to me, with each leaf bearing toothy-edged finger-like lobes jutting out in all directions. At first, the leaf looked green, but the more I focused on it, a blue hue became increasingly apparent. The point from…

Zamia integrifolia – Coontie

In my home state of Florida, the native cycad is a staple landscape plant in parking lot islands, foundation plantings…anywhere. These cycads are planted as individual textural specimens or massed in clumps or rows. Aside from their attractiveness, their popularity also is due to their propensity for being a durable, drought-tolerant and frost-hardy option for…

Prunus mume – Flowering Apricot

Prunus mume ‘Josephine’ bending well with woody lilies at the edge of the south dry garden One of the stars among Peckerwood’s many winter-interest plants is Prunus mume, also known as the flowering apricot. For quite some time, as evidenced by some large trees on the property, John Fairey has been amassing various cultivars for trial here in…

Platanus rzedowskii (formerly P. mexicana) – Mexican Sycamore

Taken in late October, the green foliage of Populus rzedowskii contrasts against the browned leaves of surrounding native P. occidentalis. I recently learned that likely every Mexican sycamore in cultivation, widely known under the Latin name Platanus mexicana is actually a different species altogether – Platanus rzedowskii. I am now doubtful if the “true” P. mexicana is actually cultivated in the U.S. This incorrect…