Posted on

Rites of Spring at Peckerwood Garden

Rites of Spring at Peckerwood Garden

COME AND CELEBRATE THE BIRTH OF SPRING here at Peckerwood garden with a dinner prepared by nationally recognized chef Monica Pope. The evening will begin with a walk in the garden with guides to share their knowledge of the diverse plant collections, followed by custom cocktails and visiting with friends old and new. Enjoy Monica Pope’s locally sourced meal in the greenhouse, curated by designer Sara Eliason. Musical accompaniment will complete this beautiful evening.

SATURDAY 25th of  APRIL

5:30 pm  Meet at the garden for a guided tour

6:30 pm  Custom cocktails under the trees

7:00 pm Dining outdoors

  Tickets to this event are $125 and may be purchased through the website. or by calling Bethany at the garden 979-826-3232.

Please purchase your tickets by April 20th.

Dress: festive/outdoors (comfortable shoes) Directions can be found at www.peckerwoodgarden.org/contact

Peckerwood Garden is a preservation partner of the Garden Conservancy, one of just fifteen in the U.S.

Posted on

Peckerwood Garden in “Houstonia”

“Houstonia” Magazine’s Spring Gardening Guide

Houston’s 5 Best Public Gardens

Peckerwood Garden:

Most of the plants in this 10-acre botanical garden, located about halfway between Houston and College Station, were grown from seeds collected by its founder, retired Texas A&M architecture professor John Gaston Fairey, over decades of trips to Mexico. Founded as a private garden, the grounds are now open to the public, and feature a wide array of Asian and native Texas plants, interspersed with Mexican sculptures from Fairey’s extensive collection.

Posted on

Peckerwood Garden in the Houston Chronicle

Peckerwood Garden created with the eye of an artist” by Kathy Huber.

After more than four decades, John Fairey sees no end to the planting at Peckerwood Garden, his legendary living laboratory near Hempstead.

“I’m always thinking about what to add,” the gracious 84-year-old South Carolina native says as he gently lifts the leaf of a fish-tail camellia for closer inspection. “I like to collect. Maybe that’s good, maybe bad. But part of the mystery of gardening is what people can grow.”

At least 70 plants are waiting in the wings at Peckerwood, but the plantsman will take the time needed to strategically place each among the 3,000 rare and unusual species and cultivars from around the world. He’ll thumb through a pile of catalogs for even more possibilities.

A collector’s enthusiasm can nix good garden design. But Fairey, an artist and retired Texas A&M design professor, has a keen, patient eye that places each plant so that its shape, color and texture are cast in perfect light.

“I think about the garden as a painting,” he says of his evolving canvas on the rolling land.

This article about Peckerwood Garden appeared in the Houston Chronicle Feb. 23, 2015. Read the full article online.